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Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
and menaced the french troops in mexico under the emperor, maximilian. maximilian had come to power in mexico during the civil war and he has supported the confederacy former rebel troops streaming into mexico, seeking refuge. the state department opposed any actions towards mexico. so sheridan today clandestine cold war, arguably the first in u.s. history. he conducted conspicuous troop maneuvers near the rio grande river and the secretly provided mexican insurgents with weapons from the federal arsenal. partly due to sheridan zephyrs, but also events in europe, the emperor, napoleon the third cam withdrew his support of maximilian. maximilian's regime collapsed and the mexican insurgents that sheridan has ordered took control of their country. sheridan was a military governor of texas and louisiana during the early phases of reconstruction. the army commanders in the south were caught between congresses harsh reconstruction policies and president andrew johnson's opposition to them. most of them kept a low profile. sheridan did not. urged on by grant, he alone removed the light at officials
talks about her experience growing up in mexico without her parents immigrated to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> host: reyna grande, what is [speaking in spanish] >> guest: [speaking in spanish] the way i grew up knowing [speaking in spanish] was a reference to the united states. but to me, because i grew up in this hometown surrounded by mountains and i didn't know where the united states was, to me it was the other side of the mountain. during that time that my parents were gone, working here in the u.s., i would look at the mountains and think my parents were on the other side of those mountains. post a word as you grow up -- which is where we borne? >> guest: i was born in mexico and a little town that nobody has heard of. but when i mentioned, it is three hours away. >> host: when did your parents come to the united states? how old were you? >> guest: my father came in 1877 when i was two years old and he sent for another three years later. savanna that came in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. poster wanted to come to the unit
of chapter 2 of the book which is called titled "turn on," and it's in mexico in the summer of 1960. timothy leery brought the bull of mushrooms up to the nose and sniffed. the smell reminded him of musty new england basements or a downed tree rotting in a damp forest. it was now or never. he placed one of the black things in the mouth and followed up fast with a cold chaser of mexican beer. they tasted worst than they smelled, bitter, stringing, and he stuffed the rest in the mouth, washed it down with a few gulps of alcohol. it was supposed to be just a regular summer veigh dation cation, time to relax before starting the new academic year. he and his son, jack, now 10 years old, scouted out the city and found a villa for represent, a rambling white house with scarlett trim next to a golf course. a name comes from the aztec word of placed near trees, known as the city of eternal spring, its year round climate made it a popular get away spot for hollywood hairs, crime bosses, and the german born psychologist who studied social customs in a mexican village down the road from the leery villa.
caller." and in mexico he is considered beef jerky, my repulsive sidekick, bill schulz. and he is so bright that candles light him during a blackout. sitting next to me, gary johnson, former new mexico governor and the libertarian party nominee for president. >> a block. the lede. that's the first story. >> thank you for that. well, he didn't suck. panic breathes a collective and smelly sigh of relief as they emerge from the worst debate performance in 700 years. this debate took place at hofster university. didn't know that. and no surprise the press declared captain perfect the winner. but another group was not as convinced. voters who watched the damn thing. at least when it came to the issues romney won on the economy, health care, taxes, the deficit and leadership. meanwhile other polls and focus groups showed obama winning the debate by not that much. one thing is for sure, both candidates were combative. stop laughing at me. like other shows "red eye cts convened its own group. let's see how it reacted to one of the comments. >> mr. president, have you looked at your pension?
, colorado and new mexico, that was the epicenter of what was a nationwide drought. but the epicenter of the dust bowl was this area of the worst manmade ecological disaster in american history. you go wait, man made? that had gone over my head a little bit. a decade long apocalypse that not only killed your crops but moved more dirt in one day than the entire ten-year excavation of panama canal and dumped dirt in chicago and detroit and people turned on street lights in new york and franklin roosevelt went like this and had dust in the oval office. had oklahoma on his fingertips in the oval office. then it not only killed their crops but cattle and children. they started to die of what was called the dust pneumonia. who is still alive to tell the story? and you needed to find that critical mass of people. we did that and did that shoe leather to find those people, children and teenagers at the time who would suffer through this ten-year apocalypse. i think all of us after two storms we would leave and get our children out. some stayed the whole time and figured out where the stubborn
in mexico city, john carlos--alongside tommy smith--raised their fists to protest human rights injustice. it became one of the most powerful images of the 1960's. the hall of fame sprinter says he and smith formulated exactly what they wanted to do. (john carlos/human rights activist) "we looked at what artifacts we had to bring to the table, such as the gloves, the beads, the scarf, the black shirt, to bring the puma shoe to the stand, to leave our shoes off our feet...we pretty much laid it out in terms of what we were going to do and how we were going to do it." all of these items...symbols of defying oppression. the famous black glove salute is immortalized by the statues at san jose state. and on wednesday, carlos himself was inspiring students. "these are the fights that we fight for." (lexy nuno/update news reporter): "hundreds of students gathered at the statues to hear john carlos speak, and now they're lining up behind me to meet the san jose state legend." spoken word poet malcolm halcrombe was one of those students--excited to meet the legendary activist. (malcolm halcrombe/s
is that most of the -- de conquer during the mexico can pan with an army that's usually about 104,011,000. this is the third of the size of the army much smaller dvr me you see at places like gettysburg and scott is the only person that has much experience and by the time of the civil war he's too old to take the field. all of the future civil war generals are officers who have experience with what we would call major combat operations with its still a much smaller scale and after that all they did was right on the frontier or the fortifications, so their expertise is actually in many ways also terribly deficient. but it's better than what everyone else has, which is nothing. so, there is a very small professional army, but the army the union of the confederacy produced cannot be i will describe it as a profession i would say and so probably leading until 1862 >> if you teach this to carry the naval academy, what do you want students to leave with? spaight you never want to be that professor who is sox=@= obviously trying to sell books. the civil war, the big picture theme especia
of this administration to deal in an effective and a good-faith way with mexico, with costa rica, with the other nations in trying to find a peaceful settlement to the dispute in central america has undermined our capacity to effectively deal diplomatically in this area as well. >> sir, people as well-balanced and just as father theodore hesburgh at notre dame, who headed the select commission on immigration, have pointed out repeatedly that there will be no immigration reform without employer sanctions, because it would be an unbalanced bill, and there would be simply no way to enforce it. however, putting that aside for the moment, your critics have also said repeatedly that you have not gone along with the bill or with any immigration reform because of the hispanic groups -- or hispanic leadership groups -- who actually do not represent what the hispanic-americans want, because polls show that they overwhelmingly want some kind of immigration reform. can you say, or how can you justify your position on this? and how do you respond to the criticism that this is another, or that this is an example of y
disaster and mexico is asking for the public's help. we're live to hear about if the item that saved the man's life was stolen. >> reporter: it was on a fishing trip that started south of the border at a marina like this one in oakland. police chief gave his tremendous appreciation for a life of estevez now gone. >> this is the fishing boat that went down in the sea of cortez killing eight men. charles gibson was one of the 35 survivors. >> i would have drowned without that life vest. >> it was this a red vest, which another victim had given him after they floated for four and a half hours clinging to ice. >> when daybreak came, we decided to swim. and we swam but we were separated. i was given this life vest which gave me confidence. ten hours later, i finally made it to a deserted island. >> after his brush with death, gibson, who was chief of police, began giving motivational speeches with the theme, keep kicking. >> the best was the mainstay of this talks until this week when it was stolen from the back of his police suv. >> it had sentimental value. it also represented
reserve in mexico, and this is one of the artists we represent. >> you also make prints for the artists that you represent. over here are some large prints by a phenomenal artist. >> he writes these beautiful things. anyone who has told you paradise is a book of rules is -- has only appeared through the windows. this is from all over coffee. we are contract printers for all kinds of organizations all across the country. >> thank you very much for showing us around today. i really appreciate you taking the time to let me get better acquainted with the operation and also to share with our "culturewire" team. he a >> is also my boss, which does not mean those two have anything to do with each other. you will read his biography in the program, so i will not insult you by reading it, but let me point out a few things that it does not explicitly say. he is, by every stretch of the imagination, a scholar, a gentle man, a combat-pror, a dedicated naval officer, and what we have determined, a true visionary leader. it is an honor that i have to work for admiral walsh. it is not the first time we
everybody was affected because of that. in mexico, for instance, the variation of time was 1 1/2 meters. as you can see there, when that happened, 3.34, immediately we have different waves. the high of that wave was at about 50 meters but one hour after that in one place we start having waves of 30 meters. a happened in the island of guata after that, 7:00 in the morning we are still having different waves at different places in the coast arriving every 30 minutes and the average high was about 15 meters, which is a lot. another massive effect was that the south american plate jumped over nafka plate, or nafka plate gets down. we moved 3 meters to the west and at the same time we lift up at about 3 meters in certain areas. so navy -- this is very important because in some places where you are supposed to get into with your ships, not any more. so a hydrographic survey, certain port was absolutely mandatory when you have this event. i said to the australian staff, because of that we are closer neighbors right now. here you can see an example that was before the earthquake, the dist
to speak out against the u.s. involvement in the vietnam war. former new mexico governor bill richardson spoke today about mcgovern's impact on our country. demi -- >> very sad. i think he will be remembered for his contributions on agriculture, on hunger, and then the democratic party. he transformed the party, the primary system, getting minorities involved. >> most people remember mcgovern for his run for president in 1972 against president richard nixon. among the missteps in his campaign, mcgovern was forced to dump his running mate thomas eagleton after it was learned he had a history of psychic -- psychiatric problems. nixon won by a landslide. mcgovern ran again in 1984 but dropped out because of poor primary showings. his words from that campaign still resonate today. >> the question is not -- are we better off than we were four years ago? the question is -- where will america be four years from now? [applause] what is the american future? what kind of america do we want to be? >> mcgovern helped transform the democratic party nomination process and to what it is today. he scale
in mexico where the cowboy hat and ladies in this post office think barack obama was born and when they asked me with the book was about and i tell them it is an economic and social analysis of why the end of the drug war would be good for america we failed. the response is when are the tragedy's in mexico. it's not that dangerous compared to the polls and the math. when are we going to stop arresting people for pot. left wing, right wing, they will go on this for crying out loud. the truth is black-and-white. it's dangerous for me as a journalist with two decades experience to sound too much of a cheerleader about any particular issue. you people are going to think i am cheech or maybe woody harrelson. the reality is from a journalistic perspective it is black and white civilians we can put back into our economy while hurting the cartels. i know it is up to 70% of the cartel's. but the fact is quite a lot of organized crime's are not from the heroine's of the mess, we can have american farmers growing dissent taxing it and on the industrial side but north dakota back. not to cut t
a con team playtive and i meditate and had designed my little meditation space in mexico with a cushy looking out in to screenty and peace. but i discovered the world kept calling and i kept responding and i was trying to figure how i could bring them together. the call of the world and needing to sit on my cushy. i had this dream in which when i was my grandfather and i used to watch the cars go by in the little country road and he would choose the red, and i would choose the blew. it was one of the long straight georgia highways, you know. in my dream there in the middle of the highway was my cushy, my rose colored meditation cushy. i think my dream world was trying to telling me i can travel the world, but my cushy, you know, will have to be a traveling cushy. >> and the will be out next spring. >> yes. we've been talking here with alice walker at george mason university where the entire campus is reading in fact "the the campus provided students with the "the color purple." you would like to see more allies walker. booktv spent three hours with her. you can go to booktv.org type i
in mexico and worked as a mechanic fixing the farm equipment in the central valley. some of my childhood memory ss watching laborers work for little or no compensation at a young age based on what i witnessed i developed a understanding of economic injustice. growing up in the 60s my life experience has shaped my activism and my desire to promote meaningful change for my community. in 1982 i moved to the bay area and began taking classes at san francisco state university. eventually i finished at the california institute of integral studys. i worked for a number of stockbrokerages in the financial district, and my professional career, and at night, i got more and more engaged in the local activist community advocating for various issues important to me including igbtq and tenant right issues. in 1982 my life was changed forever when my mother was involved in a serious car accident. for the next seven years, her care became my priority. upon her death, i quit my job and became a community organizer at the commission agenda. there, i fought for the rights of low income tenants and immigran
in mexico last year is asking for help tonight. as ktvu's john sasaki reports he is looking for the one item that he credits with saving his life. >> reporter: this was the fishing boat called the eric, which went down in the sea of cortez, killing eight man. >> i would have died, i would have drowned without that life vest. >> reporter: it was this red vest when other victim had given him after they floated for four and a half hours clinging to some ice chests. >> when daybreak came we decided to swim for it and we were separated of first he was given this life vest that gave me confidence and ten hours later i finally made to a deserts island r. after his brush with death, gibson who is chief of police at contra costa college is a motivational speech this week the vest was stolen from the back of his police suv. >> it represented the british columbia of mankind because a guy named glenn wong gave that to me. >> reporter: kishon says it means a lot to him. >> sometimes i reeled i might not get it back, john and that is okay. because i have it in my heart and my mind and just maybe that
engagement from the japanese nuclear reactor, be it haiti, turkey, be it mexico, be it honduras, new orleans, and hopefully we prepare for something that will never happen in the bay area. and that's what you do today. again, the great tragedy to me, the great tragedy would be if we have capabilities each of us can offer and we don't bring them to bear on the game. so i thank you and congratulate you on the difference you are making, the partners, learning the communications, learning how to be where you have to be. our responsibilities, every one of you out there, what will you do when that tap on the shoulder comes? what will you do when your pager goes off? what will you do if you hear all of a sudden los angeles has been hit by a 6.7. what will los angeles do if they hear san francisco has been hit by a 7.2? what will we do, where will you be, all those people who work for you, do they know their azuped place, do they know where to go? do we in the military understand your roles and responsibilities? do we understand how to integrate into your chain of command? do we understand ho
the assembly line in mexico. >>> that's our program for now. i'm bob abernethy. join us next week for the final part of our new miniseries, "none of the above," on the fasgrowg number of erans who say they have no religious affiliation at all. you can follow us on twitter and facebook and watch us anytime on smartphones. there's much more about the religiously unaffiliated on our website, where you can take our new survey for yourself. you can comment on all of our stories and share them. audio and video podcasts are also available. join us at pbs.org. as we leave you, more scenes from the mass and pilgrimage for life and liberty at the national shrine of the immaculate conception. are you totally unprepared? just about all of us have something hangen on our walls, pictures, paintings, art work clocks, all can come crashing dn and create broken glass. inexpensive picture hook can secure pictures to the wall and help keep you and your family safe. for more information on earthquake preparedness,
lacked was him. the former governor of new mexico. libertarian candidate for president of the united states. gary johnson. mad as hell he was excluded by the presidential commission on debate. >> great to be with you. thank you. >> geraldo: so you are on the ballot in 47 at least -- >> 48 states. >> geraldo: 48 states. >> worst case in michigan official write-in candidate. >> geraldo: they exclude you because you poll low with the libertarian candidate. all due respect. on the ballot but it shows you between 1-5% national poll. >> the issue really is being included the polls at all. when my name is included 5-6%. i'll point out the of course. do you hear my name six times evidence time you hear obama name 45 times? no. you hear my name every 5,000 name you hear obama's name. if i was given credit i should be due, i might be the next president of the united states. there would be scrutiny on my recordism would don't this if i didn't have a record to suggest i could do the job. you are not hearing from me let's not bomb iran, marriage equality is constitutionally guaranteed right, end
spill, as everyone knows in the gulf of mexico. yet again, president obama was here helping the sunshine state, helping florida. this is a guy who reached across the aisle, was truly bipartisan, wanted to help people because we were in a time of need. >> you know, governor, i talked to a lot of voters in my time here, many of them who voted for president obama the last time and they expressed some hesitation, some disappointment. they're looking around, as you note, the economy is starting to come back, but unemployment is still higher here than the national average. we're in the epicenter of the foreclosure crisis. why shouldn't people look at the president and say you could have done better? we could be better off? >> well, he was dealt a very difficult deck of cards, to put it mildly. he comes into office and we have the worst recession since the great depression. what could be more difficult than that? but, you know, he had a cool head. he did the right thing. passed the recovery act. that was not easy to do. i was happy to support it. i think it's important that people realize and r
. deep well drilling in new mexico is bringing even more to america. obama wants to invest in alternative forms of energy that will eventually replace oil. fareed za ckariazakaria, host o zakaria." fareed, welcome. this may be the one thing that partisan scorched earth politics isn't hurting. in fact, both of these candidates are arguing similar things. they're both moving toward energy independence for north america. >> exactly. and the revolution is quite extraordinary. we were all expecting a technological revolution in the industry but what we meant was wind and solar, and instead we got extraction of oil and gas. the result is that chart you showed, by the end of this decade, the united states will be the world's top exporter of oil and liquefied natural gas. >> you can use that to produce electricity which will make the cost of electricity more stable and cheaper in the united states, which could lead to a resurgence of certain industries. >> the natural gas right is very important because it lowers the cost of manufacturing. when you're thinking about manufacturing, when you're thi
barons from mexico and india. once deputy editor of the globe and mail in canada and the correspondent for the financial times and the economists she is now the editor of thompson reuters digital. we're joined by matt taibbi who has made the magazine rolling stone a go-to source for understanding the financial scandals in rural america. who can forget his 2009 article on the great american bubble machine. which describes goldman sachs as a great vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity relentlessly so jabbing its blood funnel into anything that smells like money. welcome to you both. income inequality has soared to the highest level since the great depression. with the top 1% taking 93% of the income earned in the first year after the recovery. the first full year after the recovery. why are the two candidates not talking about inequality growing at breakneck speed? >> you know, i think because it is still a taboo in american political life. and in american cultural life. one of the economists i talked to who works for the world bank, and he said to me, you know, and he's a sp
in mexico is asking for the public's help as he searched for the life vest that helped save his life. charles gibson was one of 35 people who survived after the eric sank in the sea of cortez. after the disaster gibson started giving motivational talks featuring the red life vest that he says saved his life. last week that vest was stolen from the back of his police s.u.v. >> it had sentimental value. and it also represented the goodness of man kind, actually, because a guy named glen wong took that vest off and gave it to me. >> gibson is chief of police at contra costa community college. he says anyone who has the vest can return it to the tions asked. >>> budget cuts at state universities may be causing more students to enroll at private universities. san jose mercury news reports private colleges are reporting big increases in enrollment among both freshmen and transfer students. college officials say the availability of classes and disillusionment with the spike in tuition are big factors in increased enrollment. out of state universities say they've also seen an increase in app
shipped jobs to china and mexico. >> he describes him as a corporate raider. you know, bane capital, whatever you can say about it, they were not corporate raiders. >> reporter: and this ad from a group that is opposed to the president's re-election has earned four pinocchio. >> the obama administration admitted the truth that 2.3 billion dollars of tax credits went overseas while millions of americans can't find a job. >> reporter: is is that true? no, no, virtually nothing in this ad is correct >> reporter: but no matter what the fact-checkers say the candidates often continue to make false claims. governor romney in tuesday's debate. >> a rerecent study has shown the people in the middle class will see $4,000 a year higher taxes as a result of spending and borrowing of this administration >> reporter: glen said that statement had three pinocchios. an obama camp ad claiming that romney's former company invested in a chinese manufacturer that took american jobs. >> newly published documents show mitt romney's firms were pioneers at helping companies outsource their manufacturing >>
] [applause] really, governor, your father was from mexico and you have five kids. are you sure you are not catholic? [applause] mr. president, you are not getting a free pass tonight. we arcs -- we are excited to have you here tonight. almost as excited as we were in 2008. although the catholic church does so president obama a. debt of gratitude. easieraught us if it's for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than it is for a rich man to enter the kingdom of debt -- of heaven. say what you will about the economy. mr. president, it will be a lot easier for a lot more people to get into heaven. [applause] we recognize you have some challenges this year. it is never could when your opponent has produced more sums than you have jobs. i am pretty sure that number is accurate. paul ryan gave it to me. he is such an effective attack dog, i am worried governor romney might strap him on the roof of a car. of course, president obama wishes he could put joe biden on a car, too. the amtrak quiet car. [laughter] all kidding aside, one way both got us a ride are makig t -- both are making
iraq in response to 9/11 would be like franklin roosevelt invading mexico in response to pearl harbor." that's what we have here. and what we need now is a president who understands how to bring these other countries together to recognize their stakes in this. they do have stakes in it. they've always had stakes in it. the arab countries have a stake in not having a civil war. the european countries have a stake in not having total disorder on their doorstep. but this president hasn't even held the kind of statesman-like summits that pull people together and get them to invest in those states. in fact, he's done the opposite. he pushed them away. when the secretary general kofi annan offered the united nations, he said, "no, no, we'll go do this alone." to save for halliburton the spoils of the war, they actually issued a memorandum from the defense department saying, "if you weren't with us in the war, don't bother applying for any construction." that's not a way to invite people. >> ninety seconds. >> that's totally absurd. of course, the u.n. was invited in. and we support the u.n.
of immigrants. we welcome people coming to this country as immigrants. my dad was born in mexico of american parents; ann's dad was born in wales and is a first- generation american. we welcome legal immigrants into this country. i want our legal system to work better. i want it to be streamlined. i want it to be clearer. i don't think you have to -- shouldn't have to hire a lawyer to figure out how to get into this country legally. i also think that we should give visas to people -- green cards, rather, to people who graduate with skills that we need. people around the world with accredited degrees in science and math get a green card stapled to their diploma, come to the u.s. of a. we should make sure our legal system works. number two, we're going to have to stop illegal immigration. there are 4 million people who are waiting in line to get here legally. those who've come here illegally take their place. so i will not grant amnesty to those who have come here illegally. what i will do is i'll put in place an employment verification system and make sure that employers that hire people who
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)

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